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Medea

Opera

Medea Tickets

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About Medea

'David McVicar’s production of Charpentier’s Médée... is the most brilliant show to have graced the Coliseum in years.'
The Independent

'Connolly, at the peak of her powers.'
The Guardian

'The towering central performance of Sarah Connolly. Singing with coruscating power, acting with white-hot intensity.'
The Times

'There is accomplished singing from Brindley Sherratt (Creon), Roderick Williams (Orontes), Katherine Manley (Creusa) and Rhian Lois (Nerina).'
Daily Telegraph

'An exceptionally strong cast of singer-actors, and by a top-notch period ensemble under Christian Curnyn’s direction.'
The Independent

'Fervently conducted by Christian Curnyn, sung and played with passion and style.'
The Times

'All credit to the chorus too, and to the conductor Christian Curnyn, who gave the music swagger and bounce.'
Daily Telegraph

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Banished, betrayed and besieged on all sides, the barbarian sorceress Medea exacts a terrible vengeance upon her faithless lover and all those he holds dear.

Following the ‘knockout success’ (whatsonstage) of Rameau’s Castor and Pollux, ENO continues its pioneering exploration of French Baroque operatic masterpieces with the first-ever UK staging of Charpentier’s opera. Reworking one of the most enduringly disturbing of all the Greek myths – that of a mother who murders her own children – Charpentier’s thrillingly orchestrated score boasts a harmonic daring and psychological complexity unparalleled in its day.

The exemplary cast includes internationally acclaimed British mezzo-soprano Sarah Connolly in the title role, American tenor Jeffrey Francis making his ENO debut as Jason and exceptional baritone Roderick Williams as Orontes.

Medea is staged by renowned opera director David McVicar and conducted by period specialist Christian Curnyn, whose recent handling of Castor and Pollux was hailed as ‘revelatory’ (The Daily Telegraph) and ‘ravishingly done’ (The Guardian).

Running time: 3hrs 10mins